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Two things had to happen before heavier-than-air flight became possible. First, flapping wings had to be ditched and replaced by a gliding mechanism. And secondly, engineers had to be able to call on a better power supply — the internal combustion engine.

3 scientists given Nobel Prize for cell research

Ironically, Nicolaus Otto had already patented this in From atmospheric flight, to space flight. The idea that we might one day send any object into space, let alone put men into orbit, was long regarded as preposterous. The scepticism was well-founded, since the correct technologies were simply not available.

To travel in space, a craft must reach escape velocity — for vehicles leaving Earth, this is To put this figure into perspective, the sound barrier is a mere 1, kilometres per hour, yet it was only broken in Jules Verne proposed a giant cannon in his novel From the Earth to the Moon. However, such a sudden burst of acceleration would inevitably kill any passengers instantly, and calculations have shown no cannon could be powerful enough to achieve escape velocity.

2. Thinking, Fast and Slow

The problem was effectively cracked in the early 20th century by two rocket researchers working independently — Konstantin Tsiolkovsky and Robert Goddard. Nonetheless, the first artificial satellite , Sputnik, was eventually launched in , and the first manned spaceflight followed four years later. Neither Tsiolkovsky nor Goddard lived to see it. It would mean that the atom would have to be shattered at will.

By , nuclear fission was better understood and researchers had realised that a chain reaction — one that, once started, would drive itself at increasing rates — could produce a huge explosion. In late , such a chain reaction was produced experimentally, and on August 6 the first atomic bomb used aggressively exploded over Hiroshima. Then, in , the USSR became the first country to supply some of its electricity from nuclear power with its Obninsk nuclear power plant.

According to the best theories of superconductivity, the phenomenon of superconductivity should not be possible above 30 kelvin. And yet some superconductors work perfectly well at 77 K.


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Superconductors — materials that conduct electricity with no resistance — were first discovered in To see the effect, a material normally has to be cooled to within a few degrees of absolute zero. Over the next 50 years, many superconducting materials were discovered and studied, and in a complete theory describing them was put forward by John Bardeen, Leon Cooper and John Schrieffer. The theory states that electrons within such materials move in so-called Cooper pairs.

If a pair is held together strongly enough, it can withstand any impacts from the atoms of the material, and thus experiences zero electrical resistance. However, the theory suggested that this should only be true at extremely low temperatures, when the atoms only vibrate slightly. The highest cutoff temperature yet observed admittedly under pressure is K.

Nikola Tesla and Swami Vivekananda

Yet, quite how this is all possible remains a topic of intense research. People who think of black holes as a futuristic or modern idea may be surprised to learn that the basic concept was first mooted in , in a letter to the Royal Society penned by the geologist John Michell. However, throughout the 19th century the idea was rejected as outright ridiculous. This was because physicists thought of light as a wave in the ether — it was assumed to have no mass, and therefore to be immune to gravity.

It was not until Einstein published his theory of general relativity in that this view had to be seriously revised. But, once relativity was established, black holes became a serious proposition and their properties were worked out in detail by theoreticians such as Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. Astronomers then began searching for them, and accumulated evidence that black holes are common with one at the centre of many galaxies including our own and the biggest ones being responsible for high-energy cosmic rays.

Perhaps the debate has not been entirely settled, though. Devised by Ady Hershcovitch from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the plasma window uses a magnetic field to fill a small region of space with plasma or ionised gas. The devices, developed by Hershcovitch and the company Acceleron, are used to reduce the energy demands of electron beam welding.

By , nuclear fission was better understood and researchers had realised that a chain reaction — one that, once started, would drive itself at increasing rates — could produce a huge explosion. In late , such a chain reaction was produced experimentally, and on August 6 the first atomic bomb used aggressively exploded over Hiroshima.

Then, in , the USSR became the first country to supply some of its electricity from nuclear power with its Obninsk nuclear power plant. According to the best theories of superconductivity, the phenomenon of superconductivity should not be possible above 30 kelvin.

1. Analysing stars

And yet some superconductors work perfectly well at 77 K. Superconductors — materials that conduct electricity with no resistance — were first discovered in To see the effect, a material normally has to be cooled to within a few degrees of absolute zero. Over the next 50 years, many superconducting materials were discovered and studied, and in a complete theory describing them was put forward by John Bardeen, Leon Cooper and John Schrieffer. The theory states that electrons within such materials move in so-called Cooper pairs.

If a pair is held together strongly enough, it can withstand any impacts from the atoms of the material, and thus experiences zero electrical resistance. However, the theory suggested that this should only be true at extremely low temperatures, when the atoms only vibrate slightly. The highest cutoff temperature yet observed admittedly under pressure is K.

Cold fusion breakthrough

Yet, quite how this is all possible remains a topic of intense research. People who think of black holes as a futuristic or modern idea may be surprised to learn that the basic concept was first mooted in , in a letter to the Royal Society penned by the geologist John Michell. However, throughout the 19th century the idea was rejected as outright ridiculous. This was because physicists thought of light as a wave in the ether — it was assumed to have no mass, and therefore to be immune to gravity. It was not until Einstein published his theory of general relativity in that this view had to be seriously revised.

But, once relativity was established, black holes became a serious proposition and their properties were worked out in detail by theoreticians such as Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. Astronomers then began searching for them, and accumulated evidence that black holes are common with one at the centre of many galaxies including our own and the biggest ones being responsible for high-energy cosmic rays.

Perhaps the debate has not been entirely settled, though. Devised by Ady Hershcovitch from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the plasma window uses a magnetic field to fill a small region of space with plasma or ionised gas. The devices, developed by Hershcovitch and the company Acceleron, are used to reduce the energy demands of electron beam welding.

The plasma window has most of the properties we associate with force fields. It blocks matter well enough to act as a barrier between a vacuum and the atmosphere. It also allows lasers and electron beams to pass through unimpeded and will even glow blue, if you make the plasma out of argon.

1. Analysing stars

The only drawback is that it requires huge amounts of energy to produce plasma windows of any size, so current examples are very small. In theory, though, there is no reason they could not be made much bigger. There is nothing in the laws of physics to say invisibility is impossible, and recent advances mean certain types of cloaking device are already feasible. The last few years have seen a rash of reports concerning experimental invisibility cloaks , ever since a basic design for one was produced in These devices rely on metamaterials to guide light around objects.

The first of these only worked on microscopic objects and with microwaves.

It was thought that modifying the design for visible light would prove very challenging, but in fact it was done just one year later — albeit only in two dimensions and on a micrometre scale. The engineering challenges involved with building a practical invisibility cloak remain formidable. This is a word with a long and rather dubious history. It was coined by the paranormalist writer Charles Fort in his book Lo!

Despite its fantastical origins, physicists have achieved a kind of teleportation thanks to a bizarre quantum phenomenon called entanglement. Particles that are entangled behave as if they are linked together no matter how wide the distance between them.